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Adult, Review / July 5, 2016
Bittersweet by Sarina BowenBittersweet
Author: Sarina Bowen
Series: True North #1
Publisher: Rennie Road Books
Date: June 2016
384 pages
Source: Purchased
Genres: Contemporary
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The last person Griffin Shipley expects to find stuck in a ditch on his Vermont country road is his ex-hookup. Five years ago they’d shared a couple of steamy nights together. But that was a lifetime ago.

At twenty-seven, Griff is now the accidental patriarch of his family farm. Even his enormous shoulders feel the strain of supporting his mother, three siblings and a dotty grandfather. He doesn’t have time for the sorority girl who’s shown up expecting to buy his harvest at half price.

Vermont was never in Audrey Kidder’s travel plans. Neither was Griff Shipley. But she needs a second chance with the restaurant conglomerate employing her. Okay—a fifth chance. And no self-righteous lumbersexual farmer will stand in her way.

They’re adversaries. They want entirely different things from life. Too bad their sexual chemistry is as hot as Audrey’s top secret enchilada sauce, and then some.

Bittersweet is the first Sarina Bowen novel I’ve read and I loved it. In a genre full of MMA fighters, biker gangs, billionaire bachelors, and man-whores, it was refreshing to have a male lead who is an organic farmer in Vermont. Griffin tends fruit trees, milks cows, and makes artisan cider. He has a good relationship with his mother, three younger siblings, and grandfather, all whom his endless work helps support. You get an appreciation for the struggles farmers go through -the need to diversify your product in case one has a bad season and not enough product is there to sell, keeping an eye on where things are headed and which products will provide best over the long term, and just how much work it all is. The idea of right livelihood is something that means a lot to me and that plays a role in the story. At the end of the day, Griffin, his family, and the community of small passionate farmers that neighbor them, make their living offering something of health and value to others and do it in a manner that respects the land and animals that provide it for them. The balance between struggle and reward is something that is really noticeable from Griffins POV. He is young and misses his deceased father everyday and worries about his ability to make the right decisions for the business and his family. I found this all so much more interesting and easy to care about than other themes that often surround contemporary heroes. read more

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By: Diane