winged reviews

Today I’m hosting my stop for the blog tour celebrating the ground-breaking anthology A Change is Going to Come. The anthology features stories and poetry by Mary Bello, Aisha Bushby, Tanya Byrne, Inua Ellams, Catherine Johnson, Patrice Lawrence, Ayisha Malik, Irfan Master, Musa Okwonga, Yasmin Rahman, Phoebe Roy and Nikesh Shukla. We have one of the authors here today with a wonderful guest post (which features my namesake…!)

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By: Daphne
Adult, Review / June 9, 2017
The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky ChambersThe Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet
Publisher: CreateSpace
Date: July, 2014
404 pages
Source: Purchased
Buy the BookGoodreads

Somewhere within our crowded sky, a crew of wormhole builders hops from planet to planet, on their way to the job of a lifetime. To the galaxy at large, humanity is a minor species, and one patched-up construction vessel is a mere speck on the starchart. This is an everyday sort of ship, just trying to get from here to there.

But all voyages leave their mark, and even the most ordinary of people have stories worth telling. A young Martian woman, hoping the vastness of space will put some distance between herself and the life she‘s left behind. An alien pilot, navigating life without her own kind. A pacifist captain, awaiting the return of a loved one at war.

Set against a backdrop of curious cultures and distant worlds, this episodic tale weaves together the adventures of nine eclectic characters, each on a journey of their own.

If living in a world that struggles to be respectful, sensitive, or loving to those that are different gets you down, reading this might be a cathartic experience.

The job of the Wayfarer and it’s crew is creating wormholes for space travel. But that’s not what this book is about. It’s about the relationships between its crew members Captain Ashby, clerk Rosemary, mechanics Kizzy and Jenks, cook/healer Dr. Chef, algeist Corbin, pilot Sissix, navigator Ohan, and last but certainly not least, the ships AI Lovey (I shan’t cry).

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By: Diane
Young Adult / May 2, 2017
Strange the Dreamer by Laini TaylorStrange the Dreamer
Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
Date: March 2017
544 pages
Source: Purchased
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The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance or lose his dream forever.

What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

The answers await in Weep, but so do more mysteries—including the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams. How did he dream her before he knew she existed? And if all the gods are dead, why does she seem so real?

Welcome to Weep.

As a huge fan of both Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy and her Faeries of Dreamdark series (which WAY more people need to read!),  Strange the Dreamer was one of my most looked-forward to books of 2017.

I was so instantly attached to Lazlo Strange that I felt almost more invested at the start of the book than I was later when the limelight was shared with other characters. Lazlo’s story arc is a common one in literature and film, but popular. An orphan who doesn’t know where he comes from, he spends his days as a librarian researching the lost city of Weep, a personal obsession of his. Unexpectedly, a delegation of warriors comes one day from the lost city seeking help and Lazlo answers the call to adventure that lies outside of his books, finding a way to insinuate himself with those chosen to make the journey to Weep. As expected Laini Taylor’s prose is spellbinding and dreamy, but never in a way that drowns out the actual story and action taking place.

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By: Diane
Blog Tour, Guest Post / March 7, 2017

Today I’m hosting the lovely Laura Lam, as I couldn’t be more excited about the publication of the long awaited third installment in the Micah Grey Trilogy, Masquerade. I’m a huge fan of Pantomime (which I gave a rave review in 2012…!) and I’m thrilled to now be part of the blog tour to celebrate this series being complete, and with gorgeous new covers to boot!

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By: Daphne
Review, Young Adult / March 7, 2017
The Song Rising by Samantha ShannonThe Song Rising
Author: Samantha Shannon
Series: The Bone Season #4
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Date: March 2017
384 pages
Source: NetGalley
Genres: Fantasy
Buy the BookGoodreads

The hotly anticipated third book in the bestselling Bone Season series – a ground-breaking, dystopian fantasy of extraordinary imagination

Following a bloody battle against foes on every side, Paige Mahoney has risen to the dangerous position of Underqueen, ruling over London's criminal population.

But, having turned her back on Jaxon Hall and with vengeful enemies still at large, the task of stabilising the fractured underworld has never seemed so challenging.

Little does Paige know that her reign may be cut short by the introduction of Senshield, a deadly technology that spells doom for the clairvoyant community and the world as they know it…

* This review is for the third book in a series. While there are no big spoilers for the previous two, this is not a stand alone and will make more sense to those who have read the previous installments.

If I am reading a series that is longer than three books and am going to lose interest in it, typically book three is where it all starts to fizzle out. I enjoyed the first two book in The Bone Season despite the fact that, in general, I have no interest in dystopian novels. However the criminal underground + supernatural element in this one kept me invested and entertained. I went into The Song Rising with some prejudice, almost prepared to finally get bored and be let down.

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By: Diane